Fabian and Kalman

VERONIKA FABIAN + LAUREN KALMAN
Opening: 12 May, Sunday, 17h – 19h.
14 May – 07 June 2019
 Press Release  |   Bios

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Veronika Fabian

Veronika Fabian’s work poses as a two-way mirror between contemporary society and jewellery. Her work circulates around questioning the established and conventional, stirring up the status quo. In her chain work Fabian explores the question of identity under the current sociocultural conditions. The series Rebellious Chains visualize the process of changing identity, inspired by her own artistic journey towards jewellery. The original assumption regarding chains is that they often are subservient to the main jewel. Therefore, she transforms ordinary chains, still respecting their original values but enabling them to form their own patterns and achieve jewellery status on their own. The collection Chains for an Average Woman draws connections between women’s self-identity, popular culture and mass media, exploring how identity develops against a background of economic and cultural conditions. In her latest work she investigates the complex relationship of consumerism and craftsmanship, colliding the mass produced and the unique.

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Lauren KalmanIcons of the Flesh. Embodiers

Icons of the Flesh. Embodiers visualizes the body in ways that promote positive identification with anatomy and sexuality. The icons are signs or abstractions that point toward the body. The title Icons of the Flesh references notions of religious ideas of morality in relation to the body. These notions are contrasted by the representation of sexualized body parts and genitalia. In the Embodiers series comprised of Collars, Badges, and Buttons these sexualized body parts are simplified. With their form abstracted they can be worn in public without immediate recognition (often mistaken for other functional objects, like teapot lids, or security tags), thus serving as a public display of positive support for the body and sexuality. Rather than necklaces or brooches, they are described as badges, collars, and buttons, allusions to wearable communication devices as seen in identity building devices like military uniforms or political movements. There is also levity in their form, as they are almost naive in their simplified rendering of anatomy. These works are rendered digitally in a 3D modeling program, 3D printed, and then cast in clay. The digital fabrication adds another layer of abstraction and remove from the body. The ceramic is then set in gold-plated brass.